Author Archives: Richard Samson

Richard Samson

About Richard Samson

I’m a teacher living in Osona, Spain. I'm into tennis, dogs, and chickens. I’m also interested in translation and Moodle (well, digital tools for teaching, in general).

Metàtesi

La metàtesi lingüística fa referència a la transposició de sons a l’interior d’una paraula. De vegades, totes dues formes resultants de la paraula es troben al diccionari: àguila, àliga (ocell rapinyaire) xicalla, quitxalla (conjunt de nois o noies) egua, euga … Continue reading

Posted in Catalan, Fun | Leave a comment

Fun with back translation

Reverse translation refers to translating out of your native language into a foreign language, an activity that many interpreters do but not many professional translators. An excellent active knowledge of the foreign language is required, no doubt. Professional interpreters do … Continue reading

Posted in English, Fun, Spanish, Translation | Leave a comment

Sunset for Google Translator Toolkit

How do you translate? Do you use any particular platform? Or are you still using a word processor and a dictionary? These days most professional translators work in a web editors of one kind or another in a platform that … Continue reading

Posted in Digital stuff, Profession | Leave a comment

Terminology for translators

Tradiling has frequently had occasion to refer to the translator’s friend, the Inter-Active Terminology for Europe (IATE) database. Here are links to our previous articles: 06.10.2014, 10.05.2017, 02.10.2017, 12.11.2018. Next week, IATE fans and inquisitive minds can get an update on IATE … Continue reading

Posted in Catalan, English, French, German, Profession, Spanish, Word reference | Leave a comment

Is Britain’s democracy under threat?

For centuries Britain’s Parliament has been respected as one of the oldest and most reputable democratic institutions in the world. However, recent events have put that status in grave doubt, and there is huge uncertainty about what will happen in … Continue reading

Posted in Culture, English | Leave a comment